Canadian truckers not happy with new carbon tax

The trucking industry in Canada is denouncing the lack of control it will have over the implementation of the carbon tax by the provinces. For the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association, the measures contemplated by some provinces, such as Manitoba, will penalize businesses.

The process of adopting the carbon tax across Canada continues to generate debate. Jean-Marc Picard, the executive director of the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association, believes that differences in the application of the tax from one province to another are a “puzzle” for the profession.

“Many truckers cross several provinces. Given the differences in taxation between provinces, it will be very difficult for truckers to estimate costs, “he explains. He gives the example of New Brunswick, where the provincial government “simply decided to take a portion of the diesel tax and call it a carbon tax.” In other provinces, a new tax is being introduced. “We would like the federal government to standardize this system.”

400,000 drivers in the country

These difficulties affect an industry that, according to Jean-Marc Picard, has between 4000 and 5000 companies across the country. “That’s 400,000 drivers, a figure that can easily be multiplied by five or six for all employees,” he says.

He believes that the proposed Manitoba tax, coupled with its central location, means that the provincial government will collect a larger share of the carbon tax, because of all the trucks that cross the territory. “It benefits the province, but it puts the truckers at a disadvantage.”

400,000 drivers in the country

These difficulties affect an industry that, according to Jean-Marc Picard, has between 4000 and 5000 companies across the country. “That’s 400,000 drivers, a figure that can easily be multiplied by five or six for all employees,” he says.

He believes that the proposed Manitoba tax, coupled with its central location, means that the provincial government will collect a larger share of the carbon tax, because of all the trucks that cross the territory. “It benefits the province, but it puts the truckers at a disadvantage. ”

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Lea Kawalchuck

Lea Kawalchuck graduated from the University of Winnipeg 2005. Lea is an island transplant, having grown up in Manitoba. After graduating school, it didn’t take didn’t take her long to decide she wanted to stay on the island Lea has written for several major publications including The Vancouver Sun and the Huffington Post. Lea iis our community reporter and also covers world events.

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Lea Kawalchuck

About the Author: Lea Kawalchuck

Lea Kawalchuck graduated from the University of Winnipeg 2005. Lea is an island transplant, having grown up in Manitoba. After graduating school, it didn’t take didn’t take her long to decide she wanted to stay on the island Lea has written for several major publications including The Vancouver Sun and the Huffington Post. Lea iis our community reporter and also covers world events.

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