Gig Economy Transforming Work? Not so Much

Gig-Economy-Transforming-Work-Not-so-Much

Gig economy transforming work? Not so much really because it’s everywhere other than in statistics. For years economists, pundits and policymakers have struggled with the emergence of Uber, the development of interim work and opening of the relationship between organizations and their employees.  Idealists motivated the pliability provided by the freelance life. Alarmists worried about the vanishing of traditional jobs with the satisfaction and legitimate safeguarding they offered.

This issue has been discussed widely in the non-attendance of solid data. However, the Bureau of Labor Statistics published its premiere in depth look at nontraditional work since 2005, and came to a surprising cessation; the traditional job rules the roost.

Around 10 percent of American workers in 2017 were engaged in some kind of unconventional work engagements. This included Uber drivers, freelance writers and persons hired through interim help agencies, substantially, anybody whose chief source of employment comes from exterior of customary employment association. Distant from the boom of gig work, that portrays a negligible deterioration from 2005, when 11 percent of employees fell into that category.

Michael R. Strain, director of economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank said that everyone’s account got detonated. Mr. Strain and other specialists warned that the data divulged did not gesture the American workplace had persisted fixed over the past decade. The government’s numbers by plan do not involve persons who do gig or freelance work in appending to traditional jobs, and they might not entirely seize income engendering activities that people might not contemplate work.

Simon Morgan

Simon Morgan was born and raised in Ottawa. Simon has worked as a freelance journalist for nearly a decade and written for The Ottawa Sun, the Vancouver Sun and the Star. As a journalist for Island Daily Tribune, Simon mostly covers community events and human interest stories.

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Simon Morgan

About the Author: Simon Morgan

Simon Morgan was born and raised in Ottawa. Simon has worked as a freelance journalist for nearly a decade and written for The Ottawa Sun, the Vancouver Sun and the Star. As a journalist for Island Daily Tribune, Simon mostly covers community events and human interest stories.

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