Inequality Remains as Black Unemployment Hits the Lowest

Inequality-Remains-as-Black-Unemployment-Hits-the-Lowest

Inequality remains as black unemployment hits the lowest. The month of May produced another robust performance from the labor market data as national employment rate descended to 3.8 percent, a level which has not been outdone since the late 1960s.

And while unemployment plummeted last month, for most demographic groups, black unemployment drowned to its lowest level on record. At 5.9 percent, contrasted with white Americans’ 3.5 percent rate, the gap between white and black Americans has never been this narrow.

Headlines have been flowing in recent days eulogizing the securing labor market’s racial diversity, and President Donald Trump has frequently claimed atleast fragmentary credit for enhancing black Americans’ figurative standing.

However, some state that it is early to rejoice a triumph over inequality when inequality still exists. Undoubtedly, there is a gap in unemployment between black and white Americans and it has been extremely narrow since the bureau of Labor Statistics initiated tracing black or African-American unemployment goes back to 1970s. There is still a 2.1 percentage point variation between the national average and the employment facts faced by the blacks.

Andre Perry, a fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program who studies majority-black cities, regions and institutions in the U.S said that we should debate on affluence and not whether people possess a job. Equality should be the focus of the people now. Because if the black man is successful, that means America is successful.

 

Simon Morgan

Simon Morgan was born and raised in Ottawa. Simon has worked as a freelance journalist for nearly a decade and written for The Ottawa Sun, the Vancouver Sun and the Star. As a journalist for Island Daily Tribune, Simon mostly covers community events and human interest stories.

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Simon Morgan

About the Author: Simon Morgan

Simon Morgan was born and raised in Ottawa. Simon has worked as a freelance journalist for nearly a decade and written for The Ottawa Sun, the Vancouver Sun and the Star. As a journalist for Island Daily Tribune, Simon mostly covers community events and human interest stories.

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