Common Vitamin, Mineral Supplements Are Disadvantageous Over Cardiovascular Disease

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Common vitamin, mineral supplements are disadvantageous over cardiovascular disease, reports the newest research of its kind, published by the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

The most usually consumed medicinal supplements including vitamin C, mineral and calcium are just analyzed to be providing neither any benefit nor damage to the health in a few conditions such as heart disease, cardiovascular disease, premature death, strokes and heart attacks, according to the new study.

A team of researchers at the St. Michael’s Hospital and University of Toronto managed a review that followed 179 theories publicized during January 2012 to October 2017 based on the most commonly used vitamin supplements.

In a statement, study’s leading author David Jenkins, who is a professor of Nutritional Sciences department at the University of Toronto in Canada, quoted that, “We were surprised to find so few positive effects of the most common supplements that people consume. Our review found that if you want to use multivitamins, vitamin D, calcium or vitamin C, it does no harm—but there is no apparent advantage either.”

A vast spectrum of the nutritional supplements was covered in the review, which comprised calcium, zinc, iron, selenium, magnesium with vitamins A, B1, B2, B3 (niacin), B6, B9 (folic acid), C, D, E and mineral supplements β-carotene. The team also reviewed Multivitamin supplements containing a range of minerals and vitamins.

Dr. Jenkins further said, “In the absence of significant positive data – apart from folic acid’s potential reduction in the risk of stroke and heart disease – it’s most beneficial to rely on a healthy diet to get your fill of vitamins and minerals.”

 

Lea Kawalchuck

Lea Kawalchuck graduated from the University of Winnipeg 2005. Lea is an island transplant, having grown up in Manitoba. After graduating school, it didn’t take didn’t take her long to decide she wanted to stay on the island Lea has written for several major publications including The Vancouver Sun and the Huffington Post. Lea iis our community reporter and also covers world events.

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Lea Kawalchuck

About the Author: Lea Kawalchuck

Lea Kawalchuck graduated from the University of Winnipeg 2005. Lea is an island transplant, having grown up in Manitoba. After graduating school, it didn’t take didn’t take her long to decide she wanted to stay on the island Lea has written for several major publications including The Vancouver Sun and the Huffington Post. Lea iis our community reporter and also covers world events.

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