We Could Turn Back Clock on Aging By Removing Wrinkles Inside Our Cells

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We could turn back clock on aging by removing wrinkles inside our cells, a new study suggests.  When the cells in our body get wrinkly, it increases the risk of developing unwanted effects.

A new discovery from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows that the wrinkles formed in our cells’ nuclei – the compartment containing our DNA – are responsible for aging and can cause fatty liver disease. These wrinkles block the proper functioning of our genes, according to UVA researchers.

Aging is the main reason behind the lumpiness and irregularity of our nuclear membranes – is a double membrane layer that separates the contents of the nucleus from the rest of the cell- which leads to prevent genes from turning off appropriately, shows a new research from the lab of Irina M. Bochkis, PhD, of UVA’s Department of Pharmacology.

“We have the same DNA in every single cell but each cell is different,” Bochkis explained. “So how does that work? Well, actually, certain genes need to be on in the liver and they have to be turned off in the brain, for example, and vice versa. If they’re not turned off appropriately, then you have problems.”

Bochkis discovered during the research, that with age, our livers become studded with fat due to wrinkly nuclear membranes. She also said that these membranes can even cause unwanted effects of aging in other parts of the body.

Bochkis suggested an idea: it is possible to use viruses to deliver the shipment which will create normal and healthy cells. “Every time I give this talk to colleagues, they say, ‘Well, do you think this is a universal mechanism?'” she said. “In my opinion, I think it is.”

 

Sarah Buscaino

Sarah Buscaino is a seasoned journalist with 10 years experience as a reporter and investigative journalist. While studying journalism in Toronto, Sarah got her break as an intern at CITY TV. As a contributor to Island Daily Tribune, Sara covers municipal and provincial politics.

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Sarah Buscaino

About the Author: Sarah Buscaino

Sarah Buscaino is a seasoned journalist with 10 years experience as a reporter and investigative journalist. While studying journalism in Toronto, Sarah got her break as an intern at CITY TV. As a contributor to Island Daily Tribune, Sara covers municipal and provincial politics.

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